Stewart, Dr James

Stewart, Dr James

Adjunct Lecturer

University of Tasmania

My interest in animal studies originally concerned animal ethics in western philosophy. However, in the course of my PhD I began to study animal welfare movements in relation to contemporary Buddhism in South Asia. I have since worked on a range of projects concerning animals in South Asia: cow protectionism in Sri Lanka and India, vegetarianism as a response to animal protectionism in Buddhism, animal revenge literature in Sinhala Buddhist narratives, and my most recent project concerns the link between cow veneration and the worship of the goddess Pattini in Sri Lanka. My largest research contribution was my book published in 2015 by Routledge: Vegetarianism and Animal Ethics in Contemporary Buddhism.  The majority of my research concerns the relationship between humans and animals in South Asia, how religious practices influence this relationship, and how human actions can be manifested in acts of violence or non-violence towards these animals.

Stewart, J. J. 2015. Vegetarianism and Animal Ethics in Contemporary Buddhism. London: Routledge. Stewart, J. J, 2017. “Dharma Dogs: Can Animals Understand the Dharma? Textual and Ethnographic Considerations”, Journal of Buddhist Ethics pp. 1-26. See Staff Research Profile for complete publications.
Animal ethics in South Asian Religions; Animal welfare movements in South Asia; Animal ontologies in South Asia
Academia