Evans, Dr Linda

Evans, Dr Linda

Lecturer, Department of Ancient History

Macquarie University

I am an environmental historian who explores the relationship between humans and non-human animals in the ancient world as reflected in religious ideas, symbolism, philosophy, and especially art.

My PhD examined the depiction of animal behaviour in Egyptian paintings, showing that the Egyptians were surprisingly knowledgeable about a wide range of species. This was followed by a Macquarie University Research Fellowship (2008-2010), which examined The Ancient Egyptians’ Atypical Relationship with Invertebrates and then an ARC APD project (2011-2014), entitled An Environmental History of Ancient Egypt, during which I evaluated the impact of natural phenomena on Egyptian cultural expression.

As a Lecturer in the Department of Ancient History, Macquarie University, I now teach an OUA unit on Animals in the Ancient World and am currently undertaking a study of animal imagery at the ancient Egyptian site of Beni Hassan, for which my colleagues and I were recently awarded an ARC DP grant.

Evans, L., Animal Behaviour in Egyptian Art: Representations of the Natural World in Memphite Tomb Scenes, ISBN: 978-0-86668-826; 334pp (ACE Studies 9; Oxford: Aris and Phillips, 2010); Evans, L., Bird behavior in ancient Egyptian art. In: Bailleul-LeSuer, R. (ed.), Between Heaven and Earth: Birds in Ancient Egypt. Oriental Institute Museum Publications 35, ISBN: 978-1885923929; 232pp (Chicago: University of Chicago, 2012), 91-98; Evans, L., Otter or mongoose? Chewing over the evidence in wall scenes. In: Woods, A., McFarlane, A. and Binder, S. (eds), Egyptian Culture and Society: Studies in Honour of Naguib Kanawati. vol. 1, ISBN: 978-977-479-845-6; 314pp (Cairo: SCA, 2010), 119-129; Nazari, V. and Evans, L., Butterflies in ancient Egypt, Journal of the Lepidopterists’ Society 69.4 (2015), 242-267; Evans, L., Invertebrates in ancient Egyptian art: Spiders, ticks, and scorpions. In: Massiera, M., Mathieu, B. and Rouffet, F. (eds), Apprivoiser le sauvage – Taming the Wild: Glimpses on the Animal World in Ancient Egypt, Les Cahiers Égypte Nilotique et Méditerranéenne (Montpellier: Université Paul Válery, 2015), 145-157; Cooper, J. and Evans, L., Transforming into a swallow: Coffin Text spell 294 and avian behaviour, Zeitschrift für ägyptische Sprache und Altertumskunde 142 (2015), 12-24.
Human-animal relationship in the ancient world; the representation of animals in art
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